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Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Copyright and Writing

Some of these are rewritten from answers I posted on Yahoo Answers. Questions have also been reworded and combined from related questions.

Questions

Question 1: I'm writing a novel and I use the title of a famous song as my title. I also quote the entire song in my book. Is this copyright infringement?


Question 2: Can I use classic fairy tales (e.g. Cinderella, Snow White, The Little Mermaid) freely?


Question 3. Can I publish a book based on copyrighted characters? I want to write books using characters from a famous TV show and comic books, but I'm doing so independently of the TV show producers or the comic book creators.


Answer to Question 1

I'm writing a novel and I use the title of a very old and famous song as my title. I also quote the entire song in my book. Is this copyright infringement? Could the song already be in the public domain?

Titles are not protected by copyright law. In some cases, titles are registered as trademarks, so you might want to double check on the trademark status of that title.

Use of quotes can be considered 'fair use' in some instances (these rules differ from country to country). Fair use is an exception to copyright infringement (i.e. you can quote with attribution without having to pay royalties to the copyright owner). In the US, they usually apply to non-fiction. HOWEVER, if you quoted the ENTIRE song, that's beyond fair use, and you'll have to get permission to use the song, and/or a license from the copyright owners. This might mean (depending on the terms of the license) a one-time fee or a fee plus a percentage of royalties from the sale of your novel. Or they might be happy to get free publicity by having the song appear in your book.

In general, always obtain permission before using quotes or samples from copyrighted work in your own work, particularly for fiction, as soon as possible, prior to publication of your work.

As to whether the song is on the public domain: it depends on how old the song is, and when and where it was published, whether it was registered, etc.. Copyrights are valid for the lifetime of the authors and 50 to 70 years (depending on the country, 70 years for the US) after the authors' death. There are other terms for certain types of works. Once the copyright has expired (for example the lyrics of the star-spangled banner), then you are free to use it at no cost. To check if the work is in the public domain, here are some useful resources:



Source(s):


Answer to Question 2

Can I use classic fairy tales (e.g. Cinderella, Snow White, The Little Mermaid) freely?

Very old fairy tales (by Brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen, etc.) are already in the public domain. Copyright protection lasts for the lifetime of the author and 50-70 years after his/her death (depending on the country; in the US it is now 70 years after death, called the 'Mickey Mouse Protection Act'). So for very old works, the copyrights can be presumed to have expired. This doesn't allow you to plagiarize these works per se; it does allow you to use these works (e.g. publish a new picture book, etc) without having to get permission or a license to do so from the copyright owner/s.

Source(s):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright_Term_Extension_Act

Answer to Question 3

Can I publish a book based on copyrighted characters? I want to write books using characters from a famous TV show and comic books, but I'm doing so independently of the TV show producers or the comic book creators.

Sounds like you're writing fan fiction. Copyright issues are murky with regard to fan fiction. Strictly speaking, names are not protected by copyright, but can be protected as trademarks. The idea of copyright protecting the character itself (who he/she is, what he/she does) is unclear.

As long as you don't sell your work and participate in fan fiction sites, you might be ok. But the best thing to do is always seek permission from the copyright owners as soon as possible and prior to publishing your work.

If you want to publish and sell your work outside the fan fiction space, then you'll need to get a license from the copyright owners (DC comics/ networks/ producers) to use their copyrighted (and often, trademarked) characters. This might mean a one-time fee only, or a fee plus a percentage of royalties you earn from your stories.


60 comments:

  1. Can I quote the name of a title of a song in my fictional story. The title is "Somewhere over the Rainbow."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, quoting the title of the song in your fictional story is fine. Titles per se are not protected by copyright, although in some cases, they are protected by trademark.

      Delete
  2. I am a fanfiction writer and I just want to know if I can publish one of my stories. My cases and everything are original. I only use the characters and what they do. I love these characters and I love to write about them and I also love that people all around the world can read my stories but I would love to have the chance to see what would happen if they were in a book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Juanell,

      The answer would depend on where or how you may want to publish your stories, and who the characters are. a) The characters may already be in the public domain, so you may be free to publish your stories however you like. b) If they are still protected by copyright, the original author of the characters may be happy for you to publish your story in a fan fiction site, and not elsewhere. If neither a) nor b) above apply, it is rather a gray area in copyright whether characters are protected. If they are well delineated and not mere 'types', they may be protected, in which case you'll need permission from the original author to publish your stories based on his/her characters. I hope that helps.

      Delete
  3. I'm currently writing a fiction novella. In it I quote a line from the Diary of Anne Frank and the character specifically attributes the line to said book. Would this be an infringement?

    I also refer to some celebrities by name to make an analogy and also do so with the names of a few movies and books. There is nothing derogatory, just used as a common frame of reference to paint a picture and mentioned just once. I'm assuming this would be okay?

    I also do use a few trademark names - again not in a derogatory manner, but have credited them at the beginning on a page all there own. Should I try to do similar with the book/movie names as to who holds the copyright?

    I'd rather do the extra leg work than upset a fellow artist, particularly if they have good lawyers. LOL.

    Thank you for all your assistance.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Quoting a line from the Diary of Anne Frank may constitute fair use, but to be sure, you may want to seek permission from the copyright owners.
      Referring to celebrities, movies and books by name in a non-derogatory manner would generally be fine. Use of trademarks merely to name an item falls within nominative use, which is allowed. Yes, it is always good to credit all copyright and trademark owners, and even better, get permission whenever possible.
      My article on DIY Copyright will soon be appearing on an ezine for writers. It addresses all your questions above and more. Follow me on Twitter for the latest news on copyright and my article: @copyrightadvisr (no 'e')

      Delete
  4. Hi, I'm currently writing a book about the recently canceled show named Pan Am, which has a few unanswered plot lines that I would like to finish up. The book is basically about the characters' lives after the season finale. I'm wondering if it would be okay to write this book? And I'm also wondering how the process would be to get permission? Hopefully it wouldn't be hard, since the show is canceled. I would be willing pay a fee and some of the royalties; I just don't want to be sued.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi,

      Sounds like you want to write some fan fiction but, unlike most fanfic writers, you want permission to do so. That's great. I suggest you contact Sony Pictures Television; I believe they're the distributors of Pan Am.

      Good luck!

      Delete
  5. Oh, yes, I forgot to tell you in my former comment a few minutes ago, I live in the US.

    ReplyDelete
  6. A note to my previous comment. If I ask permission from Sony Pictures Television, does that mean I get a license from them to write this? Oh, yeah, I was wondering, would it count as fanfiction, for I hope to publish and make a profit from it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When you contact them, you need to describe to them what you are requesting permission to do. Their license should reflect that, e.g. they allow you to use their characters and character names and to write fiction that follows the characters' lives after the series finale. They may permit you to do this, providing that they are not seen to be endorsing your book, etc., etc. They may also charge you a licensing fee as well as require a share of the royalties from the sale of your book.
      You should have a lawyer negotiate the terms of the license with SPT. But contact SPT first to see if they are amenable to such a license.

      Delete
  7. Note to my previous comment on the book series:
    Could the producers and production company make my book an official media tie-in book if they wanted to (or if I ask)? Then Pan Am fans would truly have a bona fide continuation of the tv series. Just wondering.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sure, you could try to see what their interest might be in cross-licensing with you (they license you their characters, you license them your book).

      Good luck. I hope it all works out.

      Delete
  8. I am currently writing a science fiction novel. My main character's public identity (e.g.-Batman) is the same as one in the Marvel universe, originally in 1988. It is also named after a plane. The only trait that my character has in common with the Marvel character is that they can both fly (although the Marvel character flies through super powers, my character uses man-made wings). If I intend to sell this novel for profit (or whatever writers consider "profit"), will I need to obtain permission from Marvel? I have confirmed that they do not own the trademark to my character so that's not an issue. Thanks!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Generally, if your character is sufficiently distinct from the Marvel character of the same name, you may use the name without copyright infringement. It doesn't hurt to obtain permission, however, and is always the prudent and correct course of action to take. It is good you have checked on trademark registration as well.
      Do you really need to use the same name? It may be less of a worry to simply change the name of your character to something different from any well-known name.
      Apologies for the delay, and I hope you had a lovely Christmas holiday.

      Delete
    2. Thank you for both the legal and etiquette answers. I am probably more concerned with doing what's right than what's legally sufficient.

      I got about halfway through writing when I starting thinking about publishing and went through this process. The more I think about it the more I agree with you that it really would just be easier to change the name.

      Thank you very much for your response!! And Merry Christmas to you as well.

      Delete
  9. If I use a character name, but he is totally away from his usual situation and even in a different place than he is on the show he is on. All I use it the character. Can I publish that book?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Characters in some instances may be protected by either copyright or trademark, particularly if it is a character from a TV show. Check if it is registered in the trademark office (this is quite easy to do).

      If it is not registered as a trademark, you may still be liable for copyright infringement if your character appears similar to the show's character not just in name but in other attributes as well. It never hurts to try to obtain permission, and certainly you should do so before publishing, if your character is essentially the same as the show's character. If your character only uses the same name and the name is not registered as a trademark, it MAY be fine to use without permission, but with the little information available to me from your question, I cannot provide better advice.

      If you want to give me details of your use of the character privately and wish to receive more detailed and confidential advice, please see the link on the top right of this page (Copyright Adviser for your eyes only).

      Happy New Year!

      Delete
  10. alright, i have a story idea that is based off an ENTIRE album. i have listened to the songs and created a story in my mind, so the ideas are all mine and original. what i wish to do, is use the title of the album itself as the story title. let's just use an old Jonas Brothers album title as an example; lines, vines, and trying times. my first question is if it is legal to use the title of an album as a story title. i have read that it is legal to use song titles as story titles or chapter titles, but i haven't heard anything about album titles. but i want to use the song titles in the album as chapter titles. i know that much is legal, but will it gather any legal attention if i use the album title and all of the song titles from that album as titles in my story? of course i am going to give the band and its album credit for the inspiration in an acknowledgement. is that enough, or does more have to be done? please reply as soon as possible, before my story idea slips away.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Titles are not protected by copyright, but may be protected by trademark. Check if the album title is registered as a trademark. It would also be prudent to acknowledge the source f the title in you book, as you intend to do.
      If you want to use all the song titles AND the album title as well, you do run the risk of going beyond fair use. It would be best if you try to obtain permission first.
      On the other hand, your story should not rely too much on the use of the album and/or titleS, even if the album did inspire your story.
      I hope that helps and this isn't too late. Best of luck on your story.

      Delete
  11. Hi, I have a question. I'm making a fan comic that I might publish to a small circle of friends in the future. I have the idea of quoting a part of a German song in the first page, less than 10 lines of lyrics, and the quote would be a translation to it. Will I be infringing copyrights on the lyrics this way, or is it considered fair use?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The music industry can be very sensitive about fair use, sometimes even of only a few lines. Ten lines are quite substantial, as well.
      I would recommend you try to obtain permission to translate and use the lines. If they refuse granting permission, you could still argue fair use later on. However, I would suggest you use fewer lines from the song. And don't forget to attribute the source of the lines. Fair use is not a defense against plagiarism.

      Delete
  12. i am writing a childrens story book even though i'm just a teenager myself so i was wondering that can i use pictures from the internet,you see my book is on fairies so i was thinking that can i use pics from the internet for my book

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can only use pictures that specifically allow you to use them for something like making your book. Are you planning to sell your book?

      If you cannot find the terms of use or license for the photo, DO NOT use them for your book. Unless the license specifically says you can use them for commercial or non-commercial use, all rights are reserved, EVEN IF the copyright symbol is absent. If they say 'free to use for any purpose', or something like that, then that's fine.

      Do a search for Creative Commons-licensed photos/pictures that you can use. I also have some links in my post on http://www.copyrightadviser.com/2011/08/can-i-use-images-from-internet-for-free.html

      Best of luck on your book!

      Delete
  13. Hi there,

    I'm an editor working with an indie author who has written a book that utilizes several characters from the movie 'Fast Times at Ridgemont High'. The author does so in a manner that the characters are essentially polar opposites of how they are portrayed ion the movie. Would he be violating copyright and or trademark rules/laws by doing so? Should I advise him to possibly alter the names slightly as to avoid any issues? That was my first thought, but I would appreciate any input you have to give. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When you say 'utilizes several characters', I assume you mean the author's characters bear the same names as the characters in 'Fast Times at Ridgemont High'. If so, names are not protected by copyright. You could quickly check the USPTO database if any of the names your author/client uses are registered trademarks, in which case your use of them may constitute infringement.

      Fictional characters are generally not protected by copyright, unless they are sufficiently delineated to be original. In your client's case, you say the author's characters are 'polar opposites' of the characters in 'Fast Times at Ridgemont High'. Character copyright would therefore not really apply.

      On the other hand, a story that has the same character names as a very popular movie would fall in a gray area of fair use and fan fiction. If the work can be shown to be a parody, fair use would be easier to demonstrate.

      I agree with you that changing the character names would be the simplest solution, unless the work is meant to be a parody of the movie.

      I hope that helps. Best of luck.

      Delete
  14. Hello!
    I was wondering if I would need to get special permission to publish my novella/novel. It is based on BBC tv series Sherlock. Would I need to get permission from anyone that works on the show? Would I need to pay a fee?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi. You need to get permission from the copyright owners of the work you're using. Not sure how much of the TV series you are actually using (e.g. the characters only?), but the permissions you will need will depend on how much of it is based on the original Sherlock Holmes stories, and how much on the TV series, and other factors.

      I hope that helps. If you want to communicate to me privately with more details to get more comprehensive advice, feel free to contact me through Fiverr.com at http://fiverr.com/copyrightadvisr/give-you-advice-on-copyright-of-your-work

      Delete
  15. Can I name a company from an author's character's race? Like Hippogriff Imaging (from Harry Potter). It's staying away from specifics like Buckbeaks name, but the name I'd like to use is only from a single series like Hippogriff is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. First of all, names are not protected by copyright, but may be protected by trademark. Even assuming it was copyrighted, if you really mean to use the term 'hippogriff' (rather than just using it as an example for this question), JK Rowling did not coin that term and it has long been in use. In fact, there is at least one live registered trademark using the word 'hippogriff'.

      If you're going to use a term that is truly original and often or strongly associated with an author or a book series (e.g. Hobbit), check if the name is protected by trademark. As a business name, check registered business and company names as well, if the law of your country/state has such name registries (in addition to trademark registries).

      While strictly speaking a character's fictional race/species is not protected by copyright, you may want to ask permission from the author anyway.

      I hope that helps. For privately communicated questions and more detailed advice, you can reach me at http://fiverr.com/copyrightadvisr/give-you-advice-on-copyright-of-your-work

      Delete
  16. Hi! So I am currently writing a song that is inspired by a story from one of my favorite anime series. In the song I describe the main character relationships and my interpretations of their thoughts and emotions. I also expound upon some of the symbols, themes, and motifs that I noticed in the series. For the most part the lyrics follow the emotional story of the main character and his relationship to one other character rather than all of the people and events surrounding them. I don't use any titles, character names, direct quotes, or even references to smaller stories within the anime. All of the words and lyrics are my own. I describe the characters thoughts and emotions using imagery and only making vague references to the two characters and the overall idea behind the TV series, which is essentially a boy making a contract with a demon to get revenge for the murder of his parents. Would this be considered copyright infringement?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Stephanie,

      Based on what you write above, it appears your work was inspired by the anime, and your song follows the anime's storyline to some extent. Without seeing both the anime and your song, I think your use may not be infringing, but see my advice below.

      As I replied to another question on this website:

      'Generally speaking, plot ideas and themes per se are not protected by copyright. 'Storylines' as an expression of a plot idea may be protected, depending on how fleshed out it is.
      xxx
      Just a reminder that while there are some types of content that are not protected by copyright, they may be subject to plagiarism. As you probably are aware, to avoid plagiarizing, it is important you don't yourself forward as the author or originator of the content, and properly attributing and citing the source.'

      For other pointers on copyright as relevant to writing, please see my article from the link below:
      http://www.wow-womenonwriting.com/51-FE4-DIYCopyright.html

      I hope that helps. Best of luck on your song.

      Delete
  17. Hi
    I work for a not for profit organisation, we have a song book that was created many years ago. Most of the words to the songs have been created by members of the organisation over many years, however they are usually sung to the tunes of well known songs. At the bottom of each song in the book it states the popular tune that is used to sing the song.
    The organisation wants to produce a song book for use on Kindle and similar however we are unsure if this will breaching copyright.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is a good question. You normally need a license to perform or record a song, or to publish lyrics and the music sheet. But in this case, you are doing none of those, and merely stating the tune to which the song lyrics can be sung to. On the other hand, the rhythm of a song, in some (not all) cases, can be protected by copyright. But if you don't perform or record the song, it's not clear whether you need permission to the rhythm of the well known song.

      Any reader of the book will need a performing or recording license from the copyright owner of the tune before performing or recording your songs, in addition to obtaining permission from you or your members to the song lyrics.

      By the way, if your members still own the copyright to the song lyrics and have not granted you the right to publish the lyrics, then those are the first permissions you need to obtain.

      I hope that helps.

      Delete
    2. Thank you for your answer, just to clarify something more. Performing or recording is unlikely in terms of earning any kind of income for the songs. Often the lyrics themselves have been created around a campfire and are intended for children to sing around a campfire, does this count as a performance? We would have to clarify if the members that did create the song lyrics have granted them for use under copyright, however in many cases we may not be able to find the original writer of the lyrics. Some research is needed on our part here.

      Delete
    3. Hi again. Are you in the US?
      It is not clear whether singing around a campfire is considered "performing" a work. You might recall the controversy in the 90's when ASCAP wanted to have the Girl Scouts pay for licenses to sing songs around the campfire. I don't know whether this gap in the US copyright law has been addressed since then.
      If you check ASCAP's website FAQ's, they refer to worship services and face-to-face teaching activities in educational institutions as exempt from licenses. They advise all other users to contact their ASCAP representative for further information.
      I suggest you seek legal advice as to whether your reader's use of the tunes of well known songs for campfire singing would be exempt from licenses.

      Delete
    4. Hi

      Thank you that is interesting, no I am not in the US. I realise the laws will be different from country to country, however you have at least given a basis for me to do some research. thanks again.

      Delete
  18. Hi I was wondering if I can use a book tittle in my novel? Like Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince that she is reading or should i not include that?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there. Please see my article at http://www.copyrightadviser.com/2012/08/wow-women-on-writing-article-on-five.html
      for the answer to this question. Let me know if you have other questions after reading the article.
      Thanks.

      Delete
  19. Hi
    I've just had an idea for a book based on a character from an old tv series in the UK. The character's name would be different and as would her appearance. Her characteristics would be similiar but I intend to expand on them, make some things worse, other things more in depth and create a character whose whole world begins to fall around her as a result of the way she behaves(which definitely didn't happen in the tv series). Would this be acceptable or is it still technically plagiarism, even though technically, the two women are essentially different?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there. Please refer to my answer to PutiPato's question above on February 15, 2013, as your question is similar to that one. If anything is unclear or you have other questions, please feel free to post a question again.

      Delete
  20. Hello Copyright Advisor!

    My intent is to publish a book that contains synopsis and reviews of films put out by a particularly film studio. Am I clear to do this since its a work of non-fiction and I'm not writing a novel about their existing characters? As long as I'm clear it's an "unauthorized" guide can I use the names of their bigger film franchises in the title of the book?

    Also, while I obviously can't use their official images on the cover or in the book, could I use an original illustration or even original photographs of action figures if I'm overly desperate? Or would any image that is directly meant to be their characters be out of line?

    Thank you so much!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you write your own synopsis and your own reviews, then fair use will most likely cover your work. For purposes of reviews and critiques, you may reproduce (with acknowledgement) very short excerpts from the films; just how short would be acceptable is very subjective, so in case of doubt, ask the studio's permission.

      You will need permission to use images. It may be fine to create your own original illustrations, but it may be worthwhile to ask the studio if they are willing to provide some images for your use.

      Please note that different countries have different rules on fair use for purposes of review and critique.

      Let me know if I can be of more help. I can be contacted privately for more detailed advice at http://fiverr.com/copyrightadvisr/give-you-advice-on-copyright-of-your-work

      Delete
  21. Can I write a book about a character from Lord of the Rings with out a license if im not changing any thing to do with J.J.R Tolkien's books?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there. I've replied to very similar questions elsewhere on this page, as well as on the Post Your Questions page.
      If you require detailed advice specific to your question, feel free to check out my privately communicated advice.

      Delete
  22. hi, i was wondering if i could quote part of a song as the title of a chapter in my novel like:

    chapter 11
    I find my paradise,
    When you look me in the eyes -The Jonas Brothers - When you look me in the eyes

    that would be how i would name the chapter. So would i need to ask for copyrights is i do that? If i write my chapter title like that?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I believe I've replied to similar questions below. Also see my article at http://www.wow-womenonwriting.com/51-FE4-DIYCopyright.html
      If you require detailed advice specific to your question, feel free to check out my privately communicated advice and click on the 'Buy Now' button above.

      Delete
  23. Can a book be written insinuating about being a sequel to a popular fairytale without infringing on copyright?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My answer is based on the very little information provided and your use of the term 'insinuating', which implies that the sequel may not be infringing. But again, take this advice lightly, as I do not have enough information to go on.

      Delete
  24. This webpage is wonderful! My question is murky. This is for a comic book.

    I've taken a character's premise from a famous comic book/strip (no longer in print but definitely protected--it's even had a movie), and aged up the main character (originally a child) to a 'future' adult version. The character's name has been *changed*, but still sounds similar to the original character. So, this is kind of aged-up fanfic-y with veiled character names. The events of the story itself are primarily different from the original story. The story is satirical (along with comedic moments), but not *screamingly* so, so I don't know if that covers fair use or not (an alert reader likely figure out who the trademark character was--even without any explicit character name reference). I've also made the main character repeat a scattered handful of short phrases/words taken from the original.

    So, my main question is: Can you identify anything that I'd need to change, based on what I've detailed above, to feel 'safe' with using this?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Looks like your treading a thin line between fan fiction and writing an original story inspired by a copyrighted work. Have a read through of previous questions on this website similar to yours and see how your use fits in.
      I no longer give specific advice on this website and only provide general advice. For advice specific to your question and sent privately to you, please click on the Buy Now button and send me an email.
      Thanks.

      Delete
  25. Is it okay if I write that my work is registed while is actually not registed?

    I'm aware that if someone uses my work I won't be able to claim them. But I just wanna know if I can write that my work is registed while is actually not. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry. It's "registered."

      Delete
    2. You can use the copyright symbol and place the notice 'All Rights Reserved' on your work. As stated above, your work is protected from the moment of its creation, even without registration, and any unauthorized user will be guilty of infringement. Registration is not required in many countries, and I discuss elsewhere on this site the advantage of registering work in the US.

      Delete
  26. Hi,
    I am writing a book and I wanted to use a line from a tv show: "Her eyes Sparkled like emeralds only flawed by the icicles on her heart." It would not be read in the same context as it was said in the movie, wold this be allowed? Or would I have to change it to something like glistened like diamonds ect. Thank you very much for your time and help.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your question. I no longer give detailed advice for free. General advice is still available, but as this question is very similar to questions I've previously answered, I hope you can refer to those posts.

      For specific advice sent to you privately, please click the Buy Now button.

      Delete
  27. Can I use a line from a movie in a book I'm writing?

    ReplyDelete
  28. Hi
    I am starting my own business and wish to use the name of a character from a book as my business name. I have checked with companies house etc and the name is not currently registered - the .co.uk domain name is available.
    The name could feasibly be the name of a real person however, it isn't mine it would become a brand. The Author / creator of the character is no longer with us but his books have been made into very successful movies and the books have been re-printed.
    I would very much appreciate any advice

    ReplyDelete
  29. Hi! I hope you can answer this ASAP. i wrote a short story based from a song and music video by Calvin Harris. I am planning to publish it only in my blog. The story is not entirely copied from the music video as I have included details and twists to the plot. The characters of the video are present in my story but I gave them different names. Is it okay to publish it in my blog and acknowledge my readers that the story is inspired by Calvin Harris' music video?

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hi, I am writing a screenplay about a dark twist on fairytales. I want to use the names Happy, Sleepy, etc for the names of the Dwarfs. I know they are from the Disney version, but can I use those names?

    ReplyDelete

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